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Experts Tell Us the Best Scientific Books On Climate Change

This article showcases our top picks for the Best Scientific Books On Climate Change. We reached out to industry leaders and experts who have contributed the suggestions within this article (they have been credited for their contributions below). We are keen to hear your feedback on all of our content and our comment section is a moderated space to express your thoughts and feelings related (or not) to this article This list is in no particular order.

Climate Change by Joseph Romm

This product was recommended by Tiffany Lei from GardenGuidePost

As one of the most influential key opinion leaders on climate science and solutions, Joseph Romm, Ph.D. provides an excellent overview of what climate change is, where it is taking us, the detail on the most significant impacts of climate change, and what options there are to solve it. I like this book’s objective approach and the emphasis on science, and it also answers the questions about what we can do personally to have a meaningful impact. This book is recognized as the “best single-source primer on the state of climate change by New York Magazine.

All We Can Save by Ayana Elizabeth Johnson

This product was recommended by Alina Clark from CocoDoc

I don’t know why, but most books about climate change were written by men. This is the first book that I’ve read that features 60 leading women climate activists. This is an excellent compilation of ideas and issues brought about from women’s perspectives. The book clearly shows us the power that women have in creating the solutions we need for the climate crisis. This book is genuinely enlightening and will clearly show a different perspective towards the solution.

What We Know About Climate Change by Kerry Emanuel

This product was recommended by Lesley L. Smith from Physics Is Fun

Dr. Emanuel is a well-respected climate scientist with no political agenda. Thus, he states the scientific facts clearly and objectively for readers.

Moving to Higher Ground by John Englander

This product was recommended by Cathie Cush from N/A

This book clearly explains the science of climate change and sea-level rise and the relationship between them, as well as the many variables that impact the rate of rise. The author also explains the engineering rationale for planning for the impacts of rising seas when the exact rate of rise is difficult to predict and points to examples of places that have already begun to adapt. Bypassing politics and hype, he suggests that adapting to a changing shoreline provides opportunities for innovation and economic growth, and he also provides a useful checklist for those who have an interest in real estate close to the coast. The book is grounded in solid science, yet is very accessible to the lay reader.

Beyond Global Warming by Syukuro Manabe

This product was recommended by Ahmed Elnaggar from Set The Record Player

Manabe is a pioneer in climate modeling. In this book he dives into the science that proves human impact on climate change, and the numerical models and tools used to uncover it. The book also outlines the history of everything we know about the climate, the models we use to understand it, and the key breakthroughs. The book goes beyond global warming and explains other anomalies affecting the climate; from the rise in both droughts and precipitation to the drops in temperature in the stratosphere, Manabe and Broccoli guide the readers through expertly.

The Physics of Climate Change by Lawrence M. Krauss

This product was recommended by Gina Harper from Harper’s Nurseries

If you would like to learn about the subject of Climate Change backed up with scientific facts, this is the book to read. The author explains the physics of global warming without getting lost in political arguments. I enjoyed reading this book because I felt it was comprehensive and helped me understand what is happening to our planet. Clear information delivered in a jargon-free style, in contrast with other works on the topic that felt as though I needed a PhD to get past the first chapter.

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