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Men’s Health Week: Are Men Suffering From Depression in Silence?

Photo by Jonathan Rados on Unsplash

Exclusive research from Smart TMS shows men‘s attitudes towards depression and its treatments

  • A QUARTER of UK males say that they have suffered with undiagnosed depression for many years
  • 13% of males have left a long-term mental health issue untreated over many years in order to avoid prescription drugs
  • 16% of males who have used antidepressants say that they don’t work

This week marks Men’s Health Week, one aspect of health that is often neglected for British men is mental wellbeing. Research on the Men’s Health Forum reveals that 12.5% of British men are suffering from a common mental health disorder. Despite over one in ten males suffering from a mental health condition, men are less likely to access psychological therapies. Only 36% of referrals to Increasing Access to Psychological Therapies are men.

Men are also less likely to seek help for any mental health challenges. As highlighted by Smart TMS’s independent national research below, one in four males are currently suffering from undiagnosed depression. Furthermore, 11% of males said that the majority of their doctor’s appointments have been cancelled or missed despite them still being worried about their symptoms.

In conjunction with Men’s Health Week, Smart TMS, a specialist in mental health treatment for a number of conditions, has conducted exclusive research on men’s attitudes towards depression and its treatment in the UK.

Photo by Nik Shuliahin on Unsplash
Photo by Nik Shuliahin on Unsplash

The exclusive research surveyed over 2000 Brits and found the following:

  • 25% of males say they have suffered from undiagnosed depression for many years
    • 25% (11.4 million Brits) want their GP to prescribe an alternative treatment to prescription drugs for their depression
  • 22% of males say that what used to make them happy no longer has the same effect – a key sign of depression
    • 22% (10.7 million Brits) say that what used to make them happy no longer has the same effect – a key sign of depression
  • 13% of males have left a long-term mental health issue untreated over many years in order to avoid prescription drugs
    • 14% (6.7 million Brits) have left a long-term mental health issue untreated over many years in order to avoid prescription drugs
  • 10% of males would pay over £2,000 to receive an innovative treatment for their mental health issue
    • 10% (4.2 million Brits) would pay over £2,000 to receive an innovative treatment for their mental health issue
  • 16% of males who have used antidepressants say that they don’t work
    • 15% (7.3 million Brits) of those who have used antidepressants say that they don’t work
  • 15% of males have taken prescription medication for depression before and the side effects alone (e.g. insomnia, drowsiness) have dissuaded them from using them again
    • 14% (7 million Brits) have taken prescription medication for depression before and the side effects alone (e.g. insomnia, drowsiness) have dissuaded them from using them again
  • 11% of males had to stop using antidepressants because they found them ineffective or they had negative side effects
    • 12% (5.7 million Brits) had to stop using antidepressants because they found them ineffective or they had negative side effects
  • 8% of males think that prescribed antidepressants have stopped them from doing their job properly or stopped them from working all together
    • 6% (3.2 million Brits) think that prescribed antidepressants have stopped them from doing their job properly or stopped them from working all together

If you would be interested in this research exclusively along with commentary from experts at depression treatment specialists – Smart TMS, please do not hesitate to get in touch. We can also provide regional and age breakdowns for these stats.

Research published by the National Mental Development Unit shows that mental illness represents the single largest cause of disability. NHS, social and informal care costs £22.5 billion per annum in England (2007 figures). These costs are projected to increase by 45% to £32.6 billion by 2026 (at 2007 prices), mainly due to an increase of £9 billion in treatment and care for people with dementia. To alleviate the costs on the NHS and the wider economy, it is imperative that alternative therapies are introduced to compliment current therapies that provide long term treatment for mental health conditions.

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